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Safe sleeping standards for infants

Posted by Joy Hart on

By Leah Eagle

Whether you’ve just had a baby, or are expecting, one of the most important things to do is to create a safe sleep environment for them. Since babies spend much of their time sleeping in the first year of their lives, the nursery should be the safest room in the house.

In this blog, we’ll take a look at ways you can make sure your baby is safe while sleeping.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), there are about 3,500 sleep related deaths among U.S. babies each year. They can be from SIDS (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome), accidental suffocation or strangulation, and other unknown causes.

In 2021, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) updated its safe-sleep guidelines for infants for the first time in more than five years. It emphasized the importance for babies to sleep on their backs on flat, level surfaces to reduce their risk of SIDS.

Many of the deaths each year are preventable, and the authors of the new guidelines urge parents to take several simple steps to help keep their children safe.

The AAP has the following recommendations for a safe sleep environment for infants:

Lay your baby on their backs for all naps and at night

It’s recommended that infants be placed for sleep in the supine (back) position every time they sleep until they turn one. Studies show that babies who sleep on their backs are less likely to die suddenly and unexpectedly than babies who sleep on their stomachs or sides. Some parents may worry that babies will choke when they're on their backs, but their airway anatomy and their gag reflex will keep that from happening, including those with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).

According to the Safe to Sleep Campaign, babies automatically cough up or swallow fluid that they spit up or vomit—it's a reflex to keep the airway clear. Studies show no increase in the number of deaths from choking among babies who sleep on their backs.

Provide a firm, flat sleep surface

Use a firm, flat, sleep surface with no incline covered by a fitted sheet with no other bedding or soft objects to reduce the risk of suffocation or wedging or entrapment.

A firm surface shouldn't indent when your baby is lying on it. Any surface that inclines more than 10 degrees isn't safe for your baby to sleep on. If your baby falls asleep in a car seat, stroller, swing or infant carrier, move them to a firm sleep surface on their back as soon as possible.

Place your baby in a crib, bassinet, portable crib or play yard that meets the safety standards of the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC).

Never co-sleep with your baby 

Instead of bed sharing, room share with your baby. This means keeping your baby's sleep area in the same room where you sleep for at least the first 6 months, but in a crib, bassinet, or play yard close to your bed.

The AAP recommends room sharing because it can decrease the risk of SIDS by as much as 50% and it's much safer than bed sharing. Pillows and blankets could be dangerous for babies, along with the risk of the baby falling off the bed or someone accidentally rolling onto them during the night.

Room sharing will also make it easier for you to feed, comfort and watch your baby. If you do bring your baby into your bed to feed or comfort them, place them in their own sleep space when you're ready to go to sleep.

Once your baby is able to sit up on her own (sometime between 4 and 7 months) or pull themselves up to a standing position, it’s time to lower the mattress so they can’t climb out.

Keep soft objects and loose bedding out of your baby's sleep area

This can include items like bumper pads, pillows, blankets, comforters, mattress toppers, non-fitted sheets and stuffed animals. Keep these out of your baby’s sleep area to reduce the risk of entrapment, suffocation or strangulation.

Don't let your baby get overheated

Overheating can increase the risk of SIDS. Babies only need one more layer than you would wear in the same environment to be comfortable.

All of the above recommendations are based on studies that include infants up to 1 year.

The Safe Sleep for Babies Act was passed in 2021. It makes it unlawful to manufacture, sell, or distribute crib bumpers or inclined sleepers for infants. Specifically, inclined sleepers for infants are those designed for an infant up to one year old and have an inclined sleep surface of greater than 10 degrees.

In its new guidance, the AAP also warns against the use of commercial devices that claim to reduce the risk of SIDS or other sleep-related issues, including wearable monitors. 

To stay on top of current recommendations and for more information regarding safe sleeping, be sure to keep up-to-date on the guidance provided by the American Academy of Pediatrics and talk with your baby's pediatrician should you have any questions. 

Read more

Safe sleeping standards for infants

Posted by Joy Hart on

By Leah Eagle

Whether you’ve just had a baby, or are expecting, one of the most important things to do is to create a safe sleep environment for them. Since babies spend much of their time sleeping in the first year of their lives, the nursery should be the safest room in the house.

In this blog, we’ll take a look at ways you can make sure your baby is safe while sleeping.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), there are about 3,500 sleep related deaths among U.S. babies each year. They can be from SIDS (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome), accidental suffocation or strangulation, and other unknown causes.

In 2021, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) updated its safe-sleep guidelines for infants for the first time in more than five years. It emphasized the importance for babies to sleep on their backs on flat, level surfaces to reduce their risk of SIDS.

Many of the deaths each year are preventable, and the authors of the new guidelines urge parents to take several simple steps to help keep their children safe.

The AAP has the following recommendations for a safe sleep environment for infants:

Lay your baby on their backs for all naps and at night

It’s recommended that infants be placed for sleep in the supine (back) position every time they sleep until they turn one. Studies show that babies who sleep on their backs are less likely to die suddenly and unexpectedly than babies who sleep on their stomachs or sides. Some parents may worry that babies will choke when they're on their backs, but their airway anatomy and their gag reflex will keep that from happening, including those with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).

According to the Safe to Sleep Campaign, babies automatically cough up or swallow fluid that they spit up or vomit—it's a reflex to keep the airway clear. Studies show no increase in the number of deaths from choking among babies who sleep on their backs.

Provide a firm, flat sleep surface

Use a firm, flat, sleep surface with no incline covered by a fitted sheet with no other bedding or soft objects to reduce the risk of suffocation or wedging or entrapment.

A firm surface shouldn't indent when your baby is lying on it. Any surface that inclines more than 10 degrees isn't safe for your baby to sleep on. If your baby falls asleep in a car seat, stroller, swing or infant carrier, move them to a firm sleep surface on their back as soon as possible.

Place your baby in a crib, bassinet, portable crib or play yard that meets the safety standards of the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC).

Never co-sleep with your baby 

Instead of bed sharing, room share with your baby. This means keeping your baby's sleep area in the same room where you sleep for at least the first 6 months, but in a crib, bassinet, or play yard close to your bed.

The AAP recommends room sharing because it can decrease the risk of SIDS by as much as 50% and it's much safer than bed sharing. Pillows and blankets could be dangerous for babies, along with the risk of the baby falling off the bed or someone accidentally rolling onto them during the night.

Room sharing will also make it easier for you to feed, comfort and watch your baby. If you do bring your baby into your bed to feed or comfort them, place them in their own sleep space when you're ready to go to sleep.

Once your baby is able to sit up on her own (sometime between 4 and 7 months) or pull themselves up to a standing position, it’s time to lower the mattress so they can’t climb out.

Keep soft objects and loose bedding out of your baby's sleep area

This can include items like bumper pads, pillows, blankets, comforters, mattress toppers, non-fitted sheets and stuffed animals. Keep these out of your baby’s sleep area to reduce the risk of entrapment, suffocation or strangulation.

Don't let your baby get overheated

Overheating can increase the risk of SIDS. Babies only need one more layer than you would wear in the same environment to be comfortable.

All of the above recommendations are based on studies that include infants up to 1 year.

The Safe Sleep for Babies Act was passed in 2021. It makes it unlawful to manufacture, sell, or distribute crib bumpers or inclined sleepers for infants. Specifically, inclined sleepers for infants are those designed for an infant up to one year old and have an inclined sleep surface of greater than 10 degrees.

In its new guidance, the AAP also warns against the use of commercial devices that claim to reduce the risk of SIDS or other sleep-related issues, including wearable monitors. 

To stay on top of current recommendations and for more information regarding safe sleeping, be sure to keep up-to-date on the guidance provided by the American Academy of Pediatrics and talk with your baby's pediatrician should you have any questions. 

Read more


Sensory Development: Ideas to help your little one grow

Posted by Joy Hart on

By Leah Eagle

Chances are you’ve heard the term sensory development, but how much do you know about it? Here’s some information to explain more on just what it means.

In general, sensory development refers to the maturing of the five senses: hearing, smell, taste, touch, and vision. According to abilitypath.org, it also involves the way your baby’s nervous system receives input from these senses and then forms an appropriate motor or behavioral response- which is known as sensory processing.

From the moment your child is born, they are constantly using their senses to explore and understand their surroundings. Sensory development strengthens the use of their senses by combining different colors, textures, noises and more.

As a parent, it’s important to understand how your child’s sensory systems develop. Here are changes you can look for as they grow:

  • Hear: Although their hearing is well developed at birth, newborns cannot hear certain quiet sounds. Around 3 months, they will begin to turn their head toward sounds they hear and by 4 to 8 months, babies can hear the full range of sound frequencies.
  • Smell: Newborns have a sharp sense of smell, enough so that they can differentiate the smell of their mother’s milk from others. It won’t be until around age 5 that your child can identify some foods by smell.
  • Taste: A newborn can distinguish between sweet, salty, sour, and bitter tastes. Your baby will have full sensitivity to taste around 12 to 18 months.
  • Touch: This includes all of the physical sensations that can be felt through your baby’s skin. At birth (or shortly after), your baby can tell the difference between hot and cold temperatures and also feel pain. Between 1 to 9 months, babies can notice different textures with their hands and mouth.
  • Sight: Newborns can focus on objects about 8 to 15 inches away. By one month, they can see about three feet away. At birth, a baby's color vision is limited, but by two months, they can tell the difference between basic colors. Between 4 and 7 months old, babies will have full color vision.

Sensory Play
As your baby grows, they will develop different skills through sensory play, including language skills, fine motor skills, gross motor skills and cognitive growth.

Examples of these include: learning different ways to communicate emotions, wants and needs; their ability to use small muscle groups and coordinate movements; sitting, crawling, jumping and running and problem solving skills.

Sensory play focuses on activities that engage your child's senses and helps them develop language skills and motor skills. It also helps build nerve connections in their brain’s pathways, which can help your child complete complex tasks.

Helping with sensory development at home

There are many games and activities that stimulate your child’s senses that you can play with them to promote their sensory development.

1. Sensory bins

Fill a plastic tub or large container with different objects like water, cotton balls, buttons, dried rice or pasta. Add in small toy shovels or spoons, small toys or figurines to encourage imaginative play. (Make sure the items aren’t choking hazards and keep an eye on your child when using smaller items!)

2. Finger painting

With infants, help paint their hands and feet with a soft brush and then make prints on a piece of paper. For older babies, set up an area with paper and finger paints or brushes. Playdough or slime can work too!

3. Playing outside

Outdoor activities provide many benefits for kids including: strengthening motor skills, improving overall health and muscle strength, encouraging independence and allowing the use of creativity and imagination. Plus, they get to learn all about nature!

Whether playing in the sandbox, running around or swinging or sliding — these are all forms of sensory play.

4. Bath Time

While getting clean, babies and kids can also enjoy bubbles, rubber ducks and other bath toys for a sensory experience.

Here are some ways to promote sensory development with your baby at different ages and stages throughout their first year:

Birth to 3 months

  • Hang a mobile above their crib for visual stimulation.
  • Encourage your baby to hold or shake a rattle or something that makes a sound
  • Play or sing songs with your baby to help with their listening skills.


3 to 6 months

  • Introduce tummy time
  • When holding them, face them outward to see the world around them
  • Play in different positions to help develop their sense of movement and balance
  • Play peek-a-boo with them

6 to 9 months

  • Show them how to turns pages of a board book
  • Encourage crawling by placing objects for them to reach
  • Begin to offer baby food, including fruits and vegetables
  • Let them explore on a play mat or bouncer
  • Play with stacking toys and items with different sizes and textures

9 to 12 months

  • Give them toys that require gripping and finger movement to encourage hand and finger control.
  • Offer new foods and snacks
  • Hold both hands to encourage walking
  • Let them do certain things independently


Sensory development and focus can also be enhanced by contrasting visual patterns and textures for little ones. Did you know black and white images can even help stimulate the development of the optic nerves?

Olli+Lime's monochrome designs can help create a perfect modern nursery, while promoting a multi-sensory experience. We also have new products available to bring pops of color into your nursery. We make it easy to make your modern, multi-sensory nursery completely and truly yours.

Read more

Sensory Development: Ideas to help your little one grow

Posted by Joy Hart on

By Leah Eagle

Chances are you’ve heard the term sensory development, but how much do you know about it? Here’s some information to explain more on just what it means.

In general, sensory development refers to the maturing of the five senses: hearing, smell, taste, touch, and vision. According to abilitypath.org, it also involves the way your baby’s nervous system receives input from these senses and then forms an appropriate motor or behavioral response- which is known as sensory processing.

From the moment your child is born, they are constantly using their senses to explore and understand their surroundings. Sensory development strengthens the use of their senses by combining different colors, textures, noises and more.

As a parent, it’s important to understand how your child’s sensory systems develop. Here are changes you can look for as they grow:

  • Hear: Although their hearing is well developed at birth, newborns cannot hear certain quiet sounds. Around 3 months, they will begin to turn their head toward sounds they hear and by 4 to 8 months, babies can hear the full range of sound frequencies.
  • Smell: Newborns have a sharp sense of smell, enough so that they can differentiate the smell of their mother’s milk from others. It won’t be until around age 5 that your child can identify some foods by smell.
  • Taste: A newborn can distinguish between sweet, salty, sour, and bitter tastes. Your baby will have full sensitivity to taste around 12 to 18 months.
  • Touch: This includes all of the physical sensations that can be felt through your baby’s skin. At birth (or shortly after), your baby can tell the difference between hot and cold temperatures and also feel pain. Between 1 to 9 months, babies can notice different textures with their hands and mouth.
  • Sight: Newborns can focus on objects about 8 to 15 inches away. By one month, they can see about three feet away. At birth, a baby's color vision is limited, but by two months, they can tell the difference between basic colors. Between 4 and 7 months old, babies will have full color vision.

Sensory Play
As your baby grows, they will develop different skills through sensory play, including language skills, fine motor skills, gross motor skills and cognitive growth.

Examples of these include: learning different ways to communicate emotions, wants and needs; their ability to use small muscle groups and coordinate movements; sitting, crawling, jumping and running and problem solving skills.

Sensory play focuses on activities that engage your child's senses and helps them develop language skills and motor skills. It also helps build nerve connections in their brain’s pathways, which can help your child complete complex tasks.

Helping with sensory development at home

There are many games and activities that stimulate your child’s senses that you can play with them to promote their sensory development.

1. Sensory bins

Fill a plastic tub or large container with different objects like water, cotton balls, buttons, dried rice or pasta. Add in small toy shovels or spoons, small toys or figurines to encourage imaginative play. (Make sure the items aren’t choking hazards and keep an eye on your child when using smaller items!)

2. Finger painting

With infants, help paint their hands and feet with a soft brush and then make prints on a piece of paper. For older babies, set up an area with paper and finger paints or brushes. Playdough or slime can work too!

3. Playing outside

Outdoor activities provide many benefits for kids including: strengthening motor skills, improving overall health and muscle strength, encouraging independence and allowing the use of creativity and imagination. Plus, they get to learn all about nature!

Whether playing in the sandbox, running around or swinging or sliding — these are all forms of sensory play.

4. Bath Time

While getting clean, babies and kids can also enjoy bubbles, rubber ducks and other bath toys for a sensory experience.

Here are some ways to promote sensory development with your baby at different ages and stages throughout their first year:

Birth to 3 months

  • Hang a mobile above their crib for visual stimulation.
  • Encourage your baby to hold or shake a rattle or something that makes a sound
  • Play or sing songs with your baby to help with their listening skills.


3 to 6 months

  • Introduce tummy time
  • When holding them, face them outward to see the world around them
  • Play in different positions to help develop their sense of movement and balance
  • Play peek-a-boo with them

6 to 9 months

  • Show them how to turns pages of a board book
  • Encourage crawling by placing objects for them to reach
  • Begin to offer baby food, including fruits and vegetables
  • Let them explore on a play mat or bouncer
  • Play with stacking toys and items with different sizes and textures

9 to 12 months

  • Give them toys that require gripping and finger movement to encourage hand and finger control.
  • Offer new foods and snacks
  • Hold both hands to encourage walking
  • Let them do certain things independently


Sensory development and focus can also be enhanced by contrasting visual patterns and textures for little ones. Did you know black and white images can even help stimulate the development of the optic nerves?

Olli+Lime's monochrome designs can help create a perfect modern nursery, while promoting a multi-sensory experience. We also have new products available to bring pops of color into your nursery. We make it easy to make your modern, multi-sensory nursery completely and truly yours.

Read more


Tips & Tricks for Nursery Reorganization

Posted by Joy Hart on

By Leah Eagle

Something about turning the calendar to a new year brings about an urge for organization and decluttering.

This can also be true for your baby’s nursery. As your little one grows, there will be items that they no longer need. When this happens, it’s a good time to find a new spot for them (maybe a basement or attic?) and make some space for other items.

Reassess your original nursery set up and take an inventory on the items to decide what needs to stay and what can stay and what needs to go. Decide on a plan for items that are no longer needed. It could be storage bins or boxes in a designated area. Just make sure to label everything so you’ll know where to find it later!

Outgrown clothes
The thing babies outgrow the fastest is their clothes. Decide if you want to save those for future babies, give them to a friend or family member or make some money off of them in a consignment sale. Once you have those out of the way, there will be more room in the closet for the sizes they are currently in and larger sizes too. In addition to hanging clothes, use bins or drawers for other items like pajamas, socks, shoes and more.

If they’ve outgrown the rock and play, baby swings, activity mat or baby tubs, those can go to your storage spot also. This will make room for the next big things, like walkers or activity stations.

Changing station
The diaper changing station is like the headquarters of a nursery, but it can also become a catch-all for other things. Go through and decide what needs to stay and what can go. Obviously the necessities…diapers, wipes, ointments, lotions can stay. Things like baby brushes, almost empty tubes, expired medicines and other items need to go. Make sure all the items are organized so you can get to them quickly and easily. In addition to the nursery, it’s also good to have a diaper caddy with the same items somewhere else in the house where you spend a lot of time.

Toy storage
Once your baby can sit up and play on their own, it’s a good idea to organize their toys into baskets they can access easily. It’s also a way to keep messes at bay as everything can be placed back in the bins when finished so the room looks neat and tidy!

Baby-proof!
Once they are mobile, babies are into everything. Make sure that medicines are stored out of reach, along with anything else that may be a danger to them. Childproof cabinets and doors, avoid floor lamps, make sure wall hangings are installed safely and properly and use covers for electrical outlets.

Book storage
Whether you use a bookcase, spice racks hanging on the walls or bins to store your baby’s books, once they are big enough to enjoy them, make them easily accessible. Put board books and soft books on the bottom shelf and work up from there.

Create a feeding/pumping station
Whether you are breast or bottle feeding, have everything you need handy. Use a craft cart with wheels to make it easy to move around the house. Fill it with your pump, extra bottles, nursing pads, a nursing pillow, snacks, and a water bottle. Also add some burp cloths and a blanket or two.

Label everything
If you’re using boxes or bins to organize baby’s things, it might be hard to figure out what’s in each one of them. To help, attach labels to the outside so you can easily find what you’re looking for.

Use closet and drawer dividers
If you store your baby's items in drawers, it’s easy for them to become messy. Drawer dividers can help prevent disorganization and contain loose items like socks, sleepers, burp cloths and more. Closet dividers can help keep clothes sorted by size so you will know where one size ends and the next begins.

Think up
Make use of vertical space. Hang floating shelves to display photos or other items. While over-door organizers are made for shoes, those see-through pockets are also the perfect size for bibs, burp cloths, and other small baby items.

For something a little sturdier, try an over-the-door pantry organizer. These are made to hold spices, but they work great for baby toiletries, medicines, and more.

Toss the junk
Having a baby often means you’re showered with gifts. But that doesn’t mean you have to keep and love everything you received. It’s a constant management inflow and outflow of stuff in your space. Have a bag or bin for things that are no longer being used, and once they are full, get them out. Store items that you want to keep for future babies and get rid of the rest.

Store things outside of the nursery
Everything doesn’t have to be in the nursery. If you’re short on space, find somewhere else where things can be stored so the nursery is free for clothes and essentials.

Things to move might be:

  • Feeding items – If you prep bottles in the kitchen, keep everything in there
  • Back stock – Store all your extra diapers and toiletries in a box in another room or garage
  • Old clothes and toys – Store in the loft or garage, or give them away
  • Toys – Keep a few toy baskets in the living room for easy access

We hope this gets you inspired and excited about reorganizing and sorting items in your baby’s nursery! Wishing you and your family a Happy and Healthy New Year! 

 

Read more

Tips & Tricks for Nursery Reorganization

Posted by Joy Hart on

By Leah Eagle

Something about turning the calendar to a new year brings about an urge for organization and decluttering.

This can also be true for your baby’s nursery. As your little one grows, there will be items that they no longer need. When this happens, it’s a good time to find a new spot for them (maybe a basement or attic?) and make some space for other items.

Reassess your original nursery set up and take an inventory on the items to decide what needs to stay and what can stay and what needs to go. Decide on a plan for items that are no longer needed. It could be storage bins or boxes in a designated area. Just make sure to label everything so you’ll know where to find it later!

Outgrown clothes
The thing babies outgrow the fastest is their clothes. Decide if you want to save those for future babies, give them to a friend or family member or make some money off of them in a consignment sale. Once you have those out of the way, there will be more room in the closet for the sizes they are currently in and larger sizes too. In addition to hanging clothes, use bins or drawers for other items like pajamas, socks, shoes and more.

If they’ve outgrown the rock and play, baby swings, activity mat or baby tubs, those can go to your storage spot also. This will make room for the next big things, like walkers or activity stations.

Changing station
The diaper changing station is like the headquarters of a nursery, but it can also become a catch-all for other things. Go through and decide what needs to stay and what can go. Obviously the necessities…diapers, wipes, ointments, lotions can stay. Things like baby brushes, almost empty tubes, expired medicines and other items need to go. Make sure all the items are organized so you can get to them quickly and easily. In addition to the nursery, it’s also good to have a diaper caddy with the same items somewhere else in the house where you spend a lot of time.

Toy storage
Once your baby can sit up and play on their own, it’s a good idea to organize their toys into baskets they can access easily. It’s also a way to keep messes at bay as everything can be placed back in the bins when finished so the room looks neat and tidy!

Baby-proof!
Once they are mobile, babies are into everything. Make sure that medicines are stored out of reach, along with anything else that may be a danger to them. Childproof cabinets and doors, avoid floor lamps, make sure wall hangings are installed safely and properly and use covers for electrical outlets.

Book storage
Whether you use a bookcase, spice racks hanging on the walls or bins to store your baby’s books, once they are big enough to enjoy them, make them easily accessible. Put board books and soft books on the bottom shelf and work up from there.

Create a feeding/pumping station
Whether you are breast or bottle feeding, have everything you need handy. Use a craft cart with wheels to make it easy to move around the house. Fill it with your pump, extra bottles, nursing pads, a nursing pillow, snacks, and a water bottle. Also add some burp cloths and a blanket or two.

Label everything
If you’re using boxes or bins to organize baby’s things, it might be hard to figure out what’s in each one of them. To help, attach labels to the outside so you can easily find what you’re looking for.

Use closet and drawer dividers
If you store your baby's items in drawers, it’s easy for them to become messy. Drawer dividers can help prevent disorganization and contain loose items like socks, sleepers, burp cloths and more. Closet dividers can help keep clothes sorted by size so you will know where one size ends and the next begins.

Think up
Make use of vertical space. Hang floating shelves to display photos or other items. While over-door organizers are made for shoes, those see-through pockets are also the perfect size for bibs, burp cloths, and other small baby items.

For something a little sturdier, try an over-the-door pantry organizer. These are made to hold spices, but they work great for baby toiletries, medicines, and more.

Toss the junk
Having a baby often means you’re showered with gifts. But that doesn’t mean you have to keep and love everything you received. It’s a constant management inflow and outflow of stuff in your space. Have a bag or bin for things that are no longer being used, and once they are full, get them out. Store items that you want to keep for future babies and get rid of the rest.

Store things outside of the nursery
Everything doesn’t have to be in the nursery. If you’re short on space, find somewhere else where things can be stored so the nursery is free for clothes and essentials.

Things to move might be:

  • Feeding items – If you prep bottles in the kitchen, keep everything in there
  • Back stock – Store all your extra diapers and toiletries in a box in another room or garage
  • Old clothes and toys – Store in the loft or garage, or give them away
  • Toys – Keep a few toy baskets in the living room for easy access

We hope this gets you inspired and excited about reorganizing and sorting items in your baby’s nursery! Wishing you and your family a Happy and Healthy New Year! 

 

Read more


RSV & Flu Season - Tips to keep your little one safe

Posted by Joy Hart on

By Leah Eagle

Did you know flu season lasts from October to March? That's half the year (!) and we are right in the middle of it.

Over the past few months, you've probably heard the term "tripledemic," which refers to a collision of RSV flu, and COVID-19.

We know about COVID-19 all too well, as well as the flu, but if you have a new baby, you may not be familiar with RSV. It is the most common cause of pneumonia in babies younger than one, according to the U.S Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

So what exactly is RSV? It stands for respiratory syncytial virus, which is a viral illness that has symptoms that include trouble breathing. It can cause inflammation of the small airways in the lungs and pneumonia in babies. It is highly contagious and can cause a cough, runny nose and sometimes a fever, with symptoms usually lasting a week to 10 days.

As respiratory viruses have seen increases in children across the country, emergency rooms and hospitals have seen floods of patients.

According to yalemedicine.org, "Scott Roberts, MD, a Yale Medicine infectious diseases specialist, said that the country is seeing "record levels of RSV in young children. While the spike is usually seen in December and January, it began earlier this year.

Babies haven't developed immune responses and may not be able to fight off the infections very well. If you have a baby, you're probably wondering how to keep them healthy during this time?

Here are some tips we found online.

1. Get the flu shot

This is important and safe, not only for the mom, but for everyone who will be around the baby. Since your baby can't get their flu shot until they are six months old, the best way to keep them from getting it is by getting the shot yourself.

2. Wash your hands and use hand sanitizer

We've been doing this for almost three years now, so this shouldn't come as a surprise. Washing your hands frequently with soap and water or using hand sanitizer is one of the most important things to do each day. It may sound simple, but it is very effective.

3. Cover your mouth when coughing or sneezing

Flu and RSV can be spread through droplets containing the virus, especially when coughing or sneezing. Always cover your mouth (cough or sneeze into your shoulder or a tissue) to reduce the spread of germs. 

4. Stay away from sick people

If you know that a family member, the babysitter, or one of your friends has been under the weather, ask them to avoid seeing your child until they are completely well.

5. Hold off on kisses

You've probably seen the meme on social media about not letting anyone hold or kiss your babies during flu season. It's okay to politely tell people that it is "that season" and you are doing all you can to keep your baby healthy. 

6. Keep your baby covered when in public

When in public places, keep your baby in the stroller with a light covering. This can help keep people from wanting to see or touch them. There are also stroller tags that can be added to the stroller that warn people about getting close to your little one because of germs. 

7. Know when to call the doctor

If your child develops a fever over 100.3 degrees and is under 3 months old, contact their pediatrician. These serious illnesses can cause fevers in young infants and they need to be caught and treated quickly. If you are having trouble keeping your baby awake or you cannot wake your child, call the doctor immediately.

It's inevitable that your baby will get sick at some point, but by following these tips, it may keep them from being affected by the "tripledemic."

So how do Olli+Lime's products help keep your baby's nursery as germ-free as possible?

All of our products are durable and able to withstand the needed washings. Our fabrics are 100% cotton percale and twill, printed with water-based inks and free from toxic substances. The inks are heated to a high level, creating a stronger bond with fabric weave. This makes fabric softer and resistant to fading.

Our bedding is also OEKO-TEX Certified, which means it has been tested and is free from harmful substances and harmless to human health.

All of our crib sheets are fade resistant and give your baby the highest quality and comfort. Quality is our priority, and we only use the best fabrics.

We wish you and you: family a happy and healthy holiday season!

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RSV & Flu Season - Tips to keep your little one safe

Posted by Joy Hart on

By Leah Eagle

Did you know flu season lasts from October to March? That's half the year (!) and we are right in the middle of it.

Over the past few months, you've probably heard the term "tripledemic," which refers to a collision of RSV flu, and COVID-19.

We know about COVID-19 all too well, as well as the flu, but if you have a new baby, you may not be familiar with RSV. It is the most common cause of pneumonia in babies younger than one, according to the U.S Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

So what exactly is RSV? It stands for respiratory syncytial virus, which is a viral illness that has symptoms that include trouble breathing. It can cause inflammation of the small airways in the lungs and pneumonia in babies. It is highly contagious and can cause a cough, runny nose and sometimes a fever, with symptoms usually lasting a week to 10 days.

As respiratory viruses have seen increases in children across the country, emergency rooms and hospitals have seen floods of patients.

According to yalemedicine.org, "Scott Roberts, MD, a Yale Medicine infectious diseases specialist, said that the country is seeing "record levels of RSV in young children. While the spike is usually seen in December and January, it began earlier this year.

Babies haven't developed immune responses and may not be able to fight off the infections very well. If you have a baby, you're probably wondering how to keep them healthy during this time?

Here are some tips we found online.

1. Get the flu shot

This is important and safe, not only for the mom, but for everyone who will be around the baby. Since your baby can't get their flu shot until they are six months old, the best way to keep them from getting it is by getting the shot yourself.

2. Wash your hands and use hand sanitizer

We've been doing this for almost three years now, so this shouldn't come as a surprise. Washing your hands frequently with soap and water or using hand sanitizer is one of the most important things to do each day. It may sound simple, but it is very effective.

3. Cover your mouth when coughing or sneezing

Flu and RSV can be spread through droplets containing the virus, especially when coughing or sneezing. Always cover your mouth (cough or sneeze into your shoulder or a tissue) to reduce the spread of germs. 

4. Stay away from sick people

If you know that a family member, the babysitter, or one of your friends has been under the weather, ask them to avoid seeing your child until they are completely well.

5. Hold off on kisses

You've probably seen the meme on social media about not letting anyone hold or kiss your babies during flu season. It's okay to politely tell people that it is "that season" and you are doing all you can to keep your baby healthy. 

6. Keep your baby covered when in public

When in public places, keep your baby in the stroller with a light covering. This can help keep people from wanting to see or touch them. There are also stroller tags that can be added to the stroller that warn people about getting close to your little one because of germs. 

7. Know when to call the doctor

If your child develops a fever over 100.3 degrees and is under 3 months old, contact their pediatrician. These serious illnesses can cause fevers in young infants and they need to be caught and treated quickly. If you are having trouble keeping your baby awake or you cannot wake your child, call the doctor immediately.

It's inevitable that your baby will get sick at some point, but by following these tips, it may keep them from being affected by the "tripledemic."

So how do Olli+Lime's products help keep your baby's nursery as germ-free as possible?

All of our products are durable and able to withstand the needed washings. Our fabrics are 100% cotton percale and twill, printed with water-based inks and free from toxic substances. The inks are heated to a high level, creating a stronger bond with fabric weave. This makes fabric softer and resistant to fading.

Our bedding is also OEKO-TEX Certified, which means it has been tested and is free from harmful substances and harmless to human health.

All of our crib sheets are fade resistant and give your baby the highest quality and comfort. Quality is our priority, and we only use the best fabrics.

We wish you and you: family a happy and healthy holiday season!

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Here Now: Our Year-End Sale - Take 30% off now through the end of the year

Posted by Joy Hart on

By Leah Eagle

If you missed our Thanksgiving sale a few weeks ago, there is still time to save on discounted OLLI+LIME items during our end of the year sale!

If you’ve had your eye on any of our products, now is the time to buy! Whether you have a baby on the way in 2023, want to change up your current baby’s room or do a toddler room makeover, enjoy 30% off site wide through the end of the year.

From now, until December 31st, you can save big during our year end sale, so browse away and add to your cart while everything is discounted.

Sometimes we sadly wave bye-bye to designs due to discontinuation of fabric or changing trends. Take advantage of these deep discounts before they are gone forever on our Last Chance page, featuring our signature monochromatic baby blankets, crib sheet and lovey cuddles and grab them before they are gone! To see the last chance page, visit www.olliandlime.com/collections/last-chance.

Make sure to check out our new pre-order page, featuring a new mini triangle pattern in monochrome, a mix of blue/topaz/umber and rose/peach/gray and black. Also available is our Dreamy Ferns pattern in fuschia and Jester’s Hat featuring multi-colored hats on a sage background. Several items in the pre-order are also included in the 30% off sale. To see a sneak peek at the new products that will be available in the new year, visit www.olliandlime.com/collections/new-collection.

Our nursery essentials are bedding sets that come with pre-selected designs and include a blanket, crib sheet and crib skirt. Offering the highest value, while boasting the top designer quality fabrics and colors, you can create the nursery of your dreams.  Finalize the rest of the room with our modern nursery accessories!

One example is the Felix and Marti Classic Crib Set that features a multi triangle patterned sheet and baby blanket design that brings this collection to life while the solid black triangles add a bit of equilibrium  adding an impact to a baby's room. For pops of color with this set, you can choose By The Sea or Floaties in the Deep to bring in a blue hue.

 

If you are looking for more color, our Curated Bedding Sets already have our colors and designs mixed and matched for you, bringing the black, white and colors together. Best of all, the sets are all under $200 during the sale!

Speaking of color, we’ve got you covered with our new Colorfully Inspired line that includes blue, blush, violet and fun patterns. From our sweet solids to eye-popping gender neutral designs, you are sure to put your creative flair to use in creating a baby's special environment. There are so many options of colors and patterns to choose from in this collection.

To mix and match or add in pops of color with your bedding, check out our accessories. You can find monochrome or color options in lovey cuddles, changing pads and swaddles. OLLI+LIME focuses on high contrast accessories and decorations which promote sensory development for your growing baby.  With quality wall décor, wall décor, accent pillows and more, the monochromatic options help you customize your baby's environment and modern look!

Accent pillows come in a variety of patterns to match the crib bedding, along with wall art and easy to install wall decals to add a pop to the walls.

Everything at OLLI+LIME is handcrafted in the USA. All of the bedding products at OLLI+LIME feature 100% cotton percale fabric and are made with a fade-resistant printing process to ensure they last and give your baby comfort from their very first sleep.

Whether you are getting last minute holiday gifts or preparing a nursery for the new year, now is a perfect time to get your order in!

Read more

By Leah Eagle

If you missed our Thanksgiving sale a few weeks ago, there is still time to save on discounted OLLI+LIME items during our end of the year sale!

If you’ve had your eye on any of our products, now is the time to buy! Whether you have a baby on the way in 2023, want to change up your current baby’s room or do a toddler room makeover, enjoy 30% off site wide through the end of the year.

From now, until December 31st, you can save big during our year end sale, so browse away and add to your cart while everything is discounted.

Sometimes we sadly wave bye-bye to designs due to discontinuation of fabric or changing trends. Take advantage of these deep discounts before they are gone forever on our Last Chance page, featuring our signature monochromatic baby blankets, crib sheet and lovey cuddles and grab them before they are gone! To see the last chance page, visit www.olliandlime.com/collections/last-chance.

Make sure to check out our new pre-order page, featuring a new mini triangle pattern in monochrome, a mix of blue/topaz/umber and rose/peach/gray and black. Also available is our Dreamy Ferns pattern in fuschia and Jester’s Hat featuring multi-colored hats on a sage background. Several items in the pre-order are also included in the 30% off sale. To see a sneak peek at the new products that will be available in the new year, visit www.olliandlime.com/collections/new-collection.

Our nursery essentials are bedding sets that come with pre-selected designs and include a blanket, crib sheet and crib skirt. Offering the highest value, while boasting the top designer quality fabrics and colors, you can create the nursery of your dreams.  Finalize the rest of the room with our modern nursery accessories!

One example is the Felix and Marti Classic Crib Set that features a multi triangle patterned sheet and baby blanket design that brings this collection to life while the solid black triangles add a bit of equilibrium  adding an impact to a baby's room. For pops of color with this set, you can choose By The Sea or Floaties in the Deep to bring in a blue hue.

 

If you are looking for more color, our Curated Bedding Sets already have our colors and designs mixed and matched for you, bringing the black, white and colors together. Best of all, the sets are all under $200 during the sale!

Speaking of color, we’ve got you covered with our new Colorfully Inspired line that includes blue, blush, violet and fun patterns. From our sweet solids to eye-popping gender neutral designs, you are sure to put your creative flair to use in creating a baby's special environment. There are so many options of colors and patterns to choose from in this collection.

To mix and match or add in pops of color with your bedding, check out our accessories. You can find monochrome or color options in lovey cuddles, changing pads and swaddles. OLLI+LIME focuses on high contrast accessories and decorations which promote sensory development for your growing baby.  With quality wall décor, wall décor, accent pillows and more, the monochromatic options help you customize your baby's environment and modern look!

Accent pillows come in a variety of patterns to match the crib bedding, along with wall art and easy to install wall decals to add a pop to the walls.

Everything at OLLI+LIME is handcrafted in the USA. All of the bedding products at OLLI+LIME feature 100% cotton percale fabric and are made with a fade-resistant printing process to ensure they last and give your baby comfort from their very first sleep.

Whether you are getting last minute holiday gifts or preparing a nursery for the new year, now is a perfect time to get your order in!

Read more